He’s Rolling In His Grave – Alexandra Hoover Blog Post #7

One beautiful moment from Cymbeline that struck me (amidst all of the “wtf” moments) was when Arviragus and Guiderius sing about death after Cloten dies. A seemingly strange thing to sing about, but hey- it’s Shakespeare. It comes in Act IV, Scene 2 and I think it’s breathtaking:* *pun not intended “Fear no more the heat…

Cam Chuback–Post 8–Final Assignment

Taken from Posthumus’s soliloquy in Act 2, Scene 5 of Cymbeline: Truth: it is not constant, but is changing still.  Hell knows, in part or all, but rather all.  Revenges, ambitions, covetings, change of prides, disdain, nice longing, slanders, mutability–all faults.  O, vengeance, vengeance!  Is there no way for men to have pudency, with a sweet view?  We…

Bartolomeo Sala—6th Post

We might live in tragicomic times, as professor Archer was suggesting when saying that Fargo, as opposed to The Wire, is the kind of show which is more in tune with the spirit of the epoch—still, a play like Cymbeline seems to me so bizarre—an artistic production so distant from our contemporary taste and sensibility—that…

Angus O’Brien Cymbeline Post

One word that comes up a lot in Cymbeline is the word “Vexation.” For a tragedy / comedy hybrid, I find this word to be very apt thematically. The colloquial understanding of the word vexation is a means of confusing or confounding. However, the oxford English dictionary provides these definitions: “The action of troubling, disturbing,…

Ellie Yorke Cymbeline Blogpost

In reading “Cymbeline” this past week, I noticed the repetition of the name “Diana” (sometimes spelt “Dian”) constantly throughout the play. Almost every time the name is said, it is a man using it to compare to another woman. I decided to do some research into this name, and found that Diana was the name…

Paul Leow, Eighth Blog Post

The opening conversation between the two gentlemen in Act 1 Scene 1 of Cymbeline appears to set the stage for the generally confusing and convoluted tone of the action to follow. Much of their speech is overtly grandiloquent, and involves complex and meandering sentences and syntax, a style that can initially be rather frustrating to…

Reworking of Posthumus’ Misogynistic Rant

Devon Lawler Is there no way for men to be, but women Must be half-workers? We are all bastards, Could I find out The woman’s part in me! For there’s no motion That tends to vice in man but I affirm It is the woman’s part. Be it lying, note it, The woman’s; flattering, hers;…

State Science, Deception and Violence in Cymbeline

In Act I Scene v of Cymbeline the queen orders Dr. Cornelius to concoct a lethal potion. Dr. Cornelius though exhibits an ethical sensibility and though he delivers the drugs he inquires as to their purpose. He says, “My conscience bid me ask, wherefore you have commanded of me these most poisonous compounds” (I.v.6-7). Note the word…

Final Assignment

With great difficulty and a ton of leeway, I hope you can find the summary of the play’s plot written down using only the words of the first 13 lines of Posthumus’s speech in [2.5]. It was so fun, but maybe I’ll never do it again. Is there no way for men to be, but…

Ethan Sapienza, Final Post

Act 1, Scene 4, Lines 145-152: “By the gods… more free entertainment” Iachimo is certainly a fascinating character for obvious reasons, what with his slithering, disdainful, scheming behavior. In this passage, I found prose to be a sort of vehicle to translate his slipperiness, as he agrees to the terms of his deal with Posthumous. In…

Diana

With half of Cymbeline taking place in Rome and concerning marital loyalties, it makes sense that the figure of Diane looms over the plot of the play.  Diane, the chaste Roman goddess of women, is first referenced by Iachimo when he is testing Imogen’s fidelity to her husband.  He urges Imogen not to leave him…

Tricky Creative Writing assignment

Leah Block Cymbeline 26 April 2017 The passage I used was the following speech to Imogen, from Iachimo in Act I scene v: Had I this cheek To bathe my lips upon; this hand, whose touch, Whose every touch, would force the feeler’s soul To the oath of loyalty; this object, which Takes prisoner the…